Hurricane Irene:    Billy Stinson comforts his daughter Erin Stinson as they sit on the steps where their cottage once stood on August 28, by lois
lois
lois Hurricane Irene: Billy Stinson comforts his daughter Erin Stinson as they sit on the steps where their cottage once stood on August 28,
somethingnice
Hurricane Irene: Billy Stinson comforts his daughter Erin Stinson as they sit on the steps where their cottage once stood on August 28, by lois
lois
lois Hurricane Irene: Billy Stinson comforts his daughter Erin Stinson as they sit on the steps where their cottage once stood on August 28,
somethingnice
Hurricane Irene, 2011.  A surfer passes the broken end of the Bogue Inlet Fishing Pier in Emerald Isle, N.C. on August 28, 2011. Hurricane by vilma
vilma
vilma Hurricane Irene, 2011. A surfer passes the broken end of the Bogue Inlet Fishing Pier in Emerald Isle, N.C. on August 28, 2011. Hurricane
Women in style
Hélène Vagliano (Paris 1909-Cannes 1944), daughter of the Greek shipowner Marinos Vallianos, joined the French resistance against the collaboranionist regime of Vichy from 1941. She was arrested and tortured by Gestapo at Cannes, where she was executed on August 28, 1944, a few hours before the Allied forces entered the city of Cannes. A street in modern Cannes bears her name and a memorial on the Greek island of Cephallonia (homeland of the Vallianos family) commemorate her action. by sally
sally
sally Hélène Vagliano (Paris 1909-Cannes 1944), daughter of the Greek shipowner Marinos Vallianos, joined the French resistance against the collaboranionist regime of Vichy from 1941. She was arrested and tortured by Gestapo at Cannes, where she was executed on August 28, 1944, a few hours before the Allied forces entered the city of Cannes. A street in modern Cannes bears her name and a memorial on the Greek island of Cephallonia (homeland of the Vallianos family) commemorate her action.
Inspirational women.
Restoring teak furniture  What You Need:  Rubber Gloves  Two Brushes  Medium Grit Sandpaper  Soft Bristle Brush or Steel Wool  TSP (a cleaning agent) and a bucket of warm water  Teak Oil  Polyurethane    Instructions:    Clean: If you are dealing with teak turned old and grey you will be surprised at how this step alone will begin to transform your piece. Using a soft bristle brush or steel wool, thoroughly scrub the wood with warm water and a detergent like TSP. This gets rid of the oxidation and dirt that has built up and given the wood its silvery patina. Depending on the state of your teak this step can take quite a while and require some serious arm work. If you're starting out with some really weathered teak you will begin to see some serious transformation here as the wood's true color starts to make its appearance.    Sand: You'll need to get some medium grit sanding blocks and sand your teak by hand to even out the top layer of wood. Try to get the color as even as possible.    Dry Time: If you're like me this is the hardest part. I am so impatient that once I start I just want to keep going till it's finished, but I assure you this step is really important. Your newly cleaned teak needs a few days of drying time so that the oil you will put on in the next step can fully saturate deep into the wood's pores.    Oil: These next two steps are very toxic so make sure you are in a well ventilated area before you start applying these chemicals. Now that the wood is good and dry you are ready to apply the oil. Go get some good quality Teak Oil, a brush and some rubber gloves and lightly brush the oil over all surfaces three times each. You must do this a minimum of four rounds with an hour in-between allowing time for the oil to fully saturate the wood. Apply as many times as needed until you get the desired color of wood.    Seal: At this time your teak should be looking as good as new. After all the work you've put in you may be tempted to call it quits, but you still have one more step. You have only restored the teak's natural oil at this point but haven't protected it from further damage. That's where the polyurethane comes in to seal in the oil and protect the surface. Paint on a few coats and let dry for a few days, and you'll be ready to sit back, relax and enjoy your newly restored Teak furniture.    Store: Going from Los Angeles to Seattle I completely failed to do this step last winter so I thought I would throw it in. I used to live outside and never had to give a second thought to my outdoor furniture so upon moving to this new climate I was a bit stubborn and naive about the correct upkeep. So if you don't live somewhere that has year round summer then you should either cover your furniture or bring it into an unheated garage. I say unheated because temperature changes and excess heat can crack your wood.      MORE TEAK RESTORATION ON APARTMENT THERAPY:  How To Care For Teak Furniture by babyblu3
babyblu3
babyblu3 Restoring teak furniture What You Need: Rubber Gloves Two Brushes Medium Grit Sandpaper Soft Bristle Brush or Steel Wool TSP (a cleaning agent) and a bucket of warm water Teak Oil Polyurethane Instructions: Clean: If you are dealing with teak turned old and grey you will be surprised at how this step alone will begin to transform your piece. Using a soft bristle brush or steel wool, thoroughly scrub the wood with warm water and a detergent like TSP. This gets rid of the oxidation and dirt that has built up and given the wood its silvery patina. Depending on the state of your teak this step can take quite a while and require some serious arm work. If you're starting out with some really weathered teak you will begin to see some serious transformation here as the wood's true color starts to make its appearance. Sand: You'll need to get some medium grit sanding blocks and sand your teak by hand to even out the top layer of wood. Try to get the color as even as possible. Dry Time: If you're like me this is the hardest part. I am so impatient that once I start I just want to keep going till it's finished, but I assure you this step is really important. Your newly cleaned teak needs a few days of drying time so that the oil you will put on in the next step can fully saturate deep into the wood's pores. Oil: These next two steps are very toxic so make sure you are in a well ventilated area before you start applying these chemicals. Now that the wood is good and dry you are ready to apply the oil. Go get some good quality Teak Oil, a brush and some rubber gloves and lightly brush the oil over all surfaces three times each. You must do this a minimum of four rounds with an hour in-between allowing time for the oil to fully saturate the wood. Apply as many times as needed until you get the desired color of wood. Seal: At this time your teak should be looking as good as new. After all the work you've put in you may be tempted to call it quits, but you still have one more step. You have only restored the teak's natural oil at this point but haven't protected it from further damage. That's where the polyurethane comes in to seal in the oil and protect the surface. Paint on a few coats and let dry for a few days, and you'll be ready to sit back, relax and enjoy your newly restored Teak furniture. Store: Going from Los Angeles to Seattle I completely failed to do this step last winter so I thought I would throw it in. I used to live outside and never had to give a second thought to my outdoor furniture so upon moving to this new climate I was a bit stubborn and naive about the correct upkeep. So if you don't live somewhere that has year round summer then you should either cover your furniture or bring it into an unheated garage. I say unheated because temperature changes and excess heat can crack your wood. MORE TEAK RESTORATION ON APARTMENT THERAPY: How To Care For Teak Furniture
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