Flathead Lake, Montana. The water is so clear it looks shallow, but it's actually 370 feet. ROAD TRIP! by Lemon Irani
Lemon Irani
Lemon Irani Flathead Lake, Montana. The water is so clear it looks shallow, but it's actually 370 feet. ROAD TRIP!
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Flathead Lake, Montana. The water is so clear it looks shallow, but it's actually 370 feet. I wanna go! by socorro
socorro
socorro Flathead Lake, Montana. The water is so clear it looks shallow, but it's actually 370 feet. I wanna go!
make me smile
Flathead Lake, Montana. The water is so clear it looks shallow, but it's actually 370 feet. by sweet.dreams
sweet.dreams
sweet.dreams Flathead Lake, Montana. The water is so clear it looks shallow, but it's actually 370 feet.
Travel
MONTANA: Flathead Lake. Water is so clear it looks shallow, but is actually nearly 400 feet deep. by socorro
socorro
socorro MONTANA: Flathead Lake. Water is so clear it looks shallow, but is actually nearly 400 feet deep.
make me smile
Flathead Lake in northwest Montana. The water is so clear that it looks like a shallow lake, when in fact, it’s 370 feet deep. Amazing! by marissa
marissa
marissa Flathead Lake in northwest Montana. The water is so clear that it looks like a shallow lake, when in fact, it’s 370 feet deep. Amazing!
Bucket List
Flathead Lake in northwest Montana. Apparently the water is so clear that it looks like a shallow lake, when in fact, it’s 370 feet deep. by marissa
marissa
marissa Flathead Lake in northwest Montana. Apparently the water is so clear that it looks like a shallow lake, when in fact, it’s 370 feet deep.
Bucket List
How deep is it? - Because of the crystal-clear water, Flathead Lake in Montana seems shallow, but in reality is 370 feet in depth. by marissa
marissa
marissa How deep is it? - Because of the crystal-clear water, Flathead Lake in Montana seems shallow, but in reality is 370 feet in depth.
Bucket List
Flathead Lake, Montana.  Looks shallow, when in fact it's 370 feet deep. by neva
neva
neva Flathead Lake, Montana. Looks shallow, when in fact it's 370 feet deep.
Travel and Culture
Because of the crystal-clear water, Flathead Lake in Montana seems shallow, but in reality is 370 feet in depth. by ltanner97
ltanner97
ltanner97 Because of the crystal-clear water, Flathead Lake in Montana seems shallow, but in reality is 370 feet in depth.
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Because of the crystal-clear water, Flathead Lake in Montana seems shallow, but in reality is 370 feet in depth. by xyz732556
xyz732556
xyz732556 Because of the crystal-clear water, Flathead Lake in Montana seems shallow, but in reality is 370 feet in depth.
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"This is Flathead Lake in northwestern Montana, USA. The water is so transparent that it seems that this is a quite shallow lake. In fact, by TRENDY N STYLES
TRENDY N STYLES
TRENDY N STYLES "This is Flathead Lake in northwestern Montana, USA. The water is so transparent that it seems that this is a quite shallow lake. In fact,
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This is Flathead Lake in northwestern Montana, USA. The water is so transparent that it seems that this is a quite shallow lake. In fact, by kara
kara
kara This is Flathead Lake in northwestern Montana, USA. The water is so transparent that it seems that this is a quite shallow lake. In fact,
How cool is this
Crystal clear water - Flathead Lake, Montana by cristina
cristina
cristina Crystal clear water - Flathead Lake, Montana
Favourite Places and Spaces
Flathead Lake in Montana, The water is so transparent that it seems that this is a lake, In fact it is 370.7 feet deep by kirsten
kirsten
kirsten Flathead Lake in Montana, The water is so transparent that it seems that this is a lake, In fact it is 370.7 feet deep
Random
Looks like the boat is flying above the water. Flathead Lake, Montana. by marissa
marissa
marissa Looks like the boat is flying above the water. Flathead Lake, Montana.
Bucket List
God's Country - looks like Flathead lake in Montana by nwelbaum
nwelbaum
nwelbaum God's Country - looks like Flathead lake in Montana
Lovely
cool-Flathead-lake-montana-crystal-clear by echkbet
echkbet
echkbet cool-Flathead-lake-montana-crystal-clear
Outside
The crystal-clear waters of Flathead Lake, Montana by MELODYJANEL
MELODYJANEL
MELODYJANEL The crystal-clear waters of Flathead Lake, Montana
Favorites
so freaky!!!! Interesting. . . This is Flathead Lake in northwestern Montana, USA. The water is so transparent that it seems that this is a by kara
kara
kara so freaky!!!! Interesting. . . This is Flathead Lake in northwestern Montana, USA. The water is so transparent that it seems that this is a
How cool is this
In northwestern Montana, the water is so transparent in this lake that it seems to be quite shallow.    It’s over 100 ft. deep. by kara
kara
kara In northwestern Montana, the water is so transparent in this lake that it seems to be quite shallow. It’s over 100 ft. deep.
How cool is this
Edinburgh Castle from Grassmarket. I miss living in England quite a bit actually. Our random road trip to Scotland one day was too much fun. It's weird to drive and see random castles dotting the shore. by cslirette
cslirette
cslirette Edinburgh Castle from Grassmarket. I miss living in England quite a bit actually. Our random road trip to Scotland one day was too much fun. It's weird to drive and see random castles dotting the shore.
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A truly pink lake -- Lake Retba in Dakar, Senegal. It's amazing pink color comes from a harmless bacteria in the water. Added bonus, it has more salt than the Dead Sea so you can float away all day. by Fernanda Prates
Fernanda Prates
Fernanda Prates A truly pink lake -- Lake Retba in Dakar, Senegal. It's amazing pink color comes from a harmless bacteria in the water. Added bonus, it has more salt than the Dead Sea so you can float away all day.
Around the world
All of the sudden I'm the asshole walking around saying things like: nope she doesn't watch that, she doesn't eat that, she doesn't play with those, we don't sing Hannah Montana songs, she doesn't eat candy for breakfast. It goes on and on. The things going on the shelves in America marketed to kids is creating a bitterness inside me that I can't quite control. I wanted to write this post so I could let off some steam and have a laugh and all it did was get me discouraged. I hate that as parents we are put in the position to look like assholes for saying no to things that just aren't good for them. I don't want my daughter to resent me because I didn't let her drink sugar water with red dye in it, or let her wear makeup when she is 4, or dress up like a princess because it's her job to be pretty. When the kids are outside playing in the pool, or fishing at the lake, or outside in general just rolling around in grass or splashing in puddles I feel like they can just be kids. I feel like we are all happiest. None of this requires toys, or an appropriate color scheme or movie theme, it's just fun. They get to just play. So I suppose we will stay outside. by rebecca2
rebecca2
rebecca2 All of the sudden I'm the asshole walking around saying things like: nope she doesn't watch that, she doesn't eat that, she doesn't play with those, we don't sing Hannah Montana songs, she doesn't eat candy for breakfast. It goes on and on. The things going on the shelves in America marketed to kids is creating a bitterness inside me that I can't quite control. I wanted to write this post so I could let off some steam and have a laugh and all it did was get me discouraged. I hate that as parents we are put in the position to look like assholes for saying no to things that just aren't good for them. I don't want my daughter to resent me because I didn't let her drink sugar water with red dye in it, or let her wear makeup when she is 4, or dress up like a princess because it's her job to be pretty. When the kids are outside playing in the pool, or fishing at the lake, or outside in general just rolling around in grass or splashing in puddles I feel like they can just be kids. I feel like we are all happiest. None of this requires toys, or an appropriate color scheme or movie theme, it's just fun. They get to just play. So I suppose we will stay outside.
The Look
Stars on Canvas. There were no directions on how to make this but it looks like a painted background on canvas, then cut out stars glued on and clear Christmas lights coming through. It's so pretty, I think it would be a great project! What a wonderful nightlight for a kids room!        reblogged by L’Art de la Curiosité by nanette
nanette
nanette Stars on Canvas. There were no directions on how to make this but it looks like a painted background on canvas, then cut out stars glued on and clear Christmas lights coming through. It's so pretty, I think it would be a great project! What a wonderful nightlight for a kids room! reblogged by L’Art de la Curiosité
Getting
Chinese snowball is one of spring's showiest shrubs. White flower clusters 6 to 8 inches across festoon its branches in late spring. The plant gets big—12 to 20 feet tall and wide. Though it looks like a hydrangea, it's actually a viburnum. Chinese Snowball Planting Guide & Where to Plant: Find a prominent spot where it will have room to grow. How to Grow: Give it full to partial sun and fertile, well-drained soil. Prune, if necessary, just after it finishes flowering in spring. by flora
flora
flora Chinese snowball is one of spring's showiest shrubs. White flower clusters 6 to 8 inches across festoon its branches in late spring. The plant gets big—12 to 20 feet tall and wide. Though it looks like a hydrangea, it's actually a viburnum. Chinese Snowball Planting Guide & Where to Plant: Find a prominent spot where it will have room to grow. How to Grow: Give it full to partial sun and fertile, well-drained soil. Prune, if necessary, just after it finishes flowering in spring.
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I've been washing my face every night with just honey and warm water and I've gotten so many compliments on how great my skin looks and how glowy it's become. Apply a thin layer of raw honey, wait 1-2 minutes, rinse away with warm water then pat dry with a clean wash cloth by marlene
marlene
marlene I've been washing my face every night with just honey and warm water and I've gotten so many compliments on how great my skin looks and how glowy it's become. Apply a thin layer of raw honey, wait 1-2 minutes, rinse away with warm water then pat dry with a clean wash cloth
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Argentinian artist Leandro Erlich created this fake pool called The Swimming Pool, for The 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan. Leandro put two clear acrylic glasses about a foot apart and filled the space in between with water. The top surface is also filled with about 4 to 5 inches of water so that it looks like a realistic pool. by Kmille
Kmille
Kmille Argentinian artist Leandro Erlich created this fake pool called The Swimming Pool, for The 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan. Leandro put two clear acrylic glasses about a foot apart and filled the space in between with water. The top surface is also filled with about 4 to 5 inches of water so that it looks like a realistic pool.
Peinture
Hand-tooled and plain gorgeous. � Calder Clark Designs As functional as it is attractive, our Old Fashioned Tea Kettle is handcrafted from pure copper, and is ideal for heating water for coffee, tea, or cocoa. A true collector's item you can actually use, it's made the same way it was hundreds of years ago. Pioneers carried them in their covered wagons, so they could savor a hot drink to wake up in the morning, or relax in the evening after exploring the unsettled West. Just be sure to use a kitchen glove when lifting by the handle, as the copper will be hotter than you might ever imagine! $349.99 by Jacob Bromwell
Jacob Bromwell
Jacob Bromwell Hand-tooled and plain gorgeous. � Calder Clark Designs As functional as it is attractive, our Old Fashioned Tea Kettle is handcrafted from pure copper, and is ideal for heating water for coffee, tea, or cocoa. A true collector's item you can actually use, it's made the same way it was hundreds of years ago. Pioneers carried them in their covered wagons, so they could savor a hot drink to wake up in the morning, or relax in the evening after exploring the unsettled West. Just be sure to use a kitchen glove when lifting by the handle, as the copper will be hotter than you might ever imagine! $349.99
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Listerine Foot Soak. Regardless of terrible reviews, this worked for me. Tried 3/10/14. Read a lot of comments and adjusted my soak accordingly. Used a clear variety of Listerine, so no blue feet. Used 1 cup Listerine, 1 cup Vinegar, and 2 cups water. Soaked for 30 mins and most of the yuk did rub off, but to get really deep, I used a pumice stone. As bad as my feet were (worse than photo!), they look pretty damn good now. Emollient cream and socks after; will def repeat before pedicure time. by elba
elba
elba Listerine Foot Soak. Regardless of terrible reviews, this worked for me. Tried 3/10/14. Read a lot of comments and adjusted my soak accordingly. Used a clear variety of Listerine, so no blue feet. Used 1 cup Listerine, 1 cup Vinegar, and 2 cups water. Soaked for 30 mins and most of the yuk did rub off, but to get really deep, I used a pumice stone. As bad as my feet were (worse than photo!), they look pretty damn good now. Emollient cream and socks after; will def repeat before pedicure time.
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A walk along an urban trail is an education in diversity. You'll pass people of many nationalities and dress with one thing in common: they need exercise outdoors. You may notice that the plant world along the way is also inhabited by species from far away places.    Vinca, an evergreen ground cover vine that now inhabits much of North America, is actually native to parts of Europe, North Africa and western Asia. The name was probably derived from a Latin word meaning "to bind." Certainly, as a ground cover, it is very effective for erosion control. In addition, David MacKenzie in Perennial Ground Covers says the tough runners used to be twisted together to form rope.    The trailing, vine-like plant is in the Dogbane family, along with Bluestar (Amsonia spp.), Asiatic Jasmine (Trachelospermum asiaticum), Confederate Jasmine (T. jasminoides) and Mandevilla. Mature height as a ground cover is usually from 8" to 18". The runners root as they go. Flowers may be blue, white or burgundy, depending upon the cultivar. Vinca prefers moist soil in partial shade to full shade, but will also tolerate sun and drought. It is deer resistant.    Two species of Vinca are commonly available: Vinca major and Vinca minor.    Vinca major is so named because the flowers and leaves are larger and the runners longer than Vinca minor. Its common name is Bigleaf Periwinkle. Leaves are oval, green or variegated, 1" wide and approximately 2" long. Simple flowers are up to 2" diameter. It is reliably hardy in USDA climate zones 6 through 9. Recommended soil pH is 5.6 to 7.8. In addition to its effectiveness as a ground cover, it is a fine subject for hanging baskets. Plant 8" to 12"    Vinca minor is commonly known as dwarf periwinkle, creeping myrtle, or death myrtle. V. minor does contain toxic substances, but MacKenzie says that "during the Middle Ages, the heads of criminals who were to be executed were adorned with stems of V. minor, hence the Italian name Fiore di morte (flower of death)." Foliage is about 3/4" wide and 1" long. Mature height is less than V. major; about 4". Evergreen foliage is deep green and shiny. It is fine for erosion control in medium-sized areas provided that water does not flow with such force that the plants are dislodged before established. Vinca minor is hardy in USDA climate zones 4 through 8. Recommended soil pH is 6.1 to 7.8. Plant 6" to 12" apart.    Vinca does well in shallow soil, even where tree roots make it impossible to cultivate. But if possible, prepare the planting bed by cultivating at least 4" deep, removing all traces of weeds. Composted manure may be incorporated into the soil. Fertilizer may be used. If you choose to do so, incorporate 10-10-10 fertilizer at a rate of no more 2 lbs. per 100 square feet into the top 4" of soil. Avoid synthetic fertilizers contacting any part of your plants.    Vinca can be planted any time you have a shovel handy, even bare root plants. It is very tough. Nevertheless, you should water occasionally until the plants become established to avoid drought stress. Maintenance is minimal. Vinca has few pest and disease problems, and tolerates poor soil.    Because it is so common, some folks think that Vinca is over-used, even invasive. But I don't agree; I'm all about diversity. It does what a ground cover is supposed to do; it covers ground. Vinca is popular because it is effective, attractive, and requires little or no maintenance.    Return to Vinca at goGardenNow.com.  Posted by John Marshall at 7:48 AM 0 comments Links to this post  Labels: drought tolerant plants, ground covers, low maintenance perennial, vinca by marcia
marcia
marcia A walk along an urban trail is an education in diversity. You'll pass people of many nationalities and dress with one thing in common: they need exercise outdoors. You may notice that the plant world along the way is also inhabited by species from far away places. Vinca, an evergreen ground cover vine that now inhabits much of North America, is actually native to parts of Europe, North Africa and western Asia. The name was probably derived from a Latin word meaning "to bind." Certainly, as a ground cover, it is very effective for erosion control. In addition, David MacKenzie in Perennial Ground Covers says the tough runners used to be twisted together to form rope. The trailing, vine-like plant is in the Dogbane family, along with Bluestar (Amsonia spp.), Asiatic Jasmine (Trachelospermum asiaticum), Confederate Jasmine (T. jasminoides) and Mandevilla. Mature height as a ground cover is usually from 8" to 18". The runners root as they go. Flowers may be blue, white or burgundy, depending upon the cultivar. Vinca prefers moist soil in partial shade to full shade, but will also tolerate sun and drought. It is deer resistant. Two species of Vinca are commonly available: Vinca major and Vinca minor. Vinca major is so named because the flowers and leaves are larger and the runners longer than Vinca minor. Its common name is Bigleaf Periwinkle. Leaves are oval, green or variegated, 1" wide and approximately 2" long. Simple flowers are up to 2" diameter. It is reliably hardy in USDA climate zones 6 through 9. Recommended soil pH is 5.6 to 7.8. In addition to its effectiveness as a ground cover, it is a fine subject for hanging baskets. Plant 8" to 12" Vinca minor is commonly known as dwarf periwinkle, creeping myrtle, or death myrtle. V. minor does contain toxic substances, but MacKenzie says that "during the Middle Ages, the heads of criminals who were to be executed were adorned with stems of V. minor, hence the Italian name Fiore di morte (flower of death)." Foliage is about 3/4" wide and 1" long. Mature height is less than V. major; about 4". Evergreen foliage is deep green and shiny. It is fine for erosion control in medium-sized areas provided that water does not flow with such force that the plants are dislodged before established. Vinca minor is hardy in USDA climate zones 4 through 8. Recommended soil pH is 6.1 to 7.8. Plant 6" to 12" apart. Vinca does well in shallow soil, even where tree roots make it impossible to cultivate. But if possible, prepare the planting bed by cultivating at least 4" deep, removing all traces of weeds. Composted manure may be incorporated into the soil. Fertilizer may be used. If you choose to do so, incorporate 10-10-10 fertilizer at a rate of no more 2 lbs. per 100 square feet into the top 4" of soil. Avoid synthetic fertilizers contacting any part of your plants. Vinca can be planted any time you have a shovel handy, even bare root plants. It is very tough. Nevertheless, you should water occasionally until the plants become established to avoid drought stress. Maintenance is minimal. Vinca has few pest and disease problems, and tolerates poor soil. Because it is so common, some folks think that Vinca is over-used, even invasive. But I don't agree; I'm all about diversity. It does what a ground cover is supposed to do; it covers ground. Vinca is popular because it is effective, attractive, and requires little or no maintenance. Return to Vinca at goGardenNow.com. Posted by John Marshall at 7:48 AM 0 comments Links to this post Labels: drought tolerant plants, ground covers, low maintenance perennial, vinca
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They used to use urine to tan animal skins, so families used to all pee in a pot & then once a day it was taken & Sold to the tannery.......if you had to do this to survive you were "Piss Poor"  But worse than that were the really poor folk who couldn't even afford to buy a pot......they "didn't have a pot to piss in" & were the lowest of the low  The next time you are washing your hands and complain because the water temperature isn't just how you like it, think about how things used to be. Here are some facts about the 1500s:  Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in May, and they still smelled pretty good by June.. However, since they were starting to smell . ...... . Brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor. Hence the custom today of carrying a bouquet when getting Married.  Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the women and finally the children. Last of all the babies. By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it.. Hence the saying, "Don't throw the baby out with the Bath water!"  Houses had thatched roofs-thick straw-piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof... Hence the saying "It's raining cats and dogs."  There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection. That's how canopy beds came into existence.  The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt. Hence the saying, "Dirt poor." The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on floor to help keep their footing. As the winter wore on, they added more thresh until, when you opened the door, it would all start slipping outside. A piece of wood was placed in the entrance-way. Hence: a thresh hold.  In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire.. Every day they lit the fire and added things to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight and then start over the next day. Sometimes stew had food in it that had been there for quite a while. Hence the rhyme: Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old. Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special. When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off. It was a sign of wealth that a man could, "bring home the bacon." They would cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit around and chew the fat.  Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with high acid content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.  Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or the upper crust.  Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky. The combination would Sometimes knock the imbibers out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial.. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up. Hence the custom of holding a wake.  England is old and small and the local folks started running out of places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a bone-house, and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive... So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the graveyard shift.) to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be, saved by the bell or was considered a dead ringer.  And that's the truth....Now, whoever said History was boring by NoelleGarcia
NoelleGarcia
NoelleGarcia They used to use urine to tan animal skins, so families used to all pee in a pot & then once a day it was taken & Sold to the tannery.......if you had to do this to survive you were "Piss Poor" But worse than that were the really poor folk who couldn't even afford to buy a pot......they "didn't have a pot to piss in" & were the lowest of the low The next time you are washing your hands and complain because the water temperature isn't just how you like it, think about how things used to be. Here are some facts about the 1500s: Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in May, and they still smelled pretty good by June.. However, since they were starting to smell . ...... . Brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor. Hence the custom today of carrying a bouquet when getting Married. Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the women and finally the children. Last of all the babies. By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it.. Hence the saying, "Don't throw the baby out with the Bath water!" Houses had thatched roofs-thick straw-piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof... Hence the saying "It's raining cats and dogs." There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection. That's how canopy beds came into existence. The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt. Hence the saying, "Dirt poor." The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on floor to help keep their footing. As the winter wore on, they added more thresh until, when you opened the door, it would all start slipping outside. A piece of wood was placed in the entrance-way. Hence: a thresh hold. In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire.. Every day they lit the fire and added things to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight and then start over the next day. Sometimes stew had food in it that had been there for quite a while. Hence the rhyme: Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old. Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special. When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off. It was a sign of wealth that a man could, "bring home the bacon." They would cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit around and chew the fat. Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with high acid content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous. Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or the upper crust. Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky. The combination would Sometimes knock the imbibers out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial.. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up. Hence the custom of holding a wake. England is old and small and the local folks started running out of places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a bone-house, and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive... So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the graveyard shift.) to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be, saved by the bell or was considered a dead ringer. And that's the truth....Now, whoever said History was boring
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