Pennisetum glaucum 'Purple Majesty'.  Also known as 'Purple Millet' this tall corn stalk like grass has deep purple foliage, immature by jill
jill
jill Pennisetum glaucum 'Purple Majesty'. Also known as 'Purple Millet' this tall corn stalk like grass has deep purple foliage, immature
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Red trillium, also known as Stinking Benjamin, has one nodding flower, with an unpleasant odor, rising on a stalk above the leaves. by jill
jill
jill Red trillium, also known as Stinking Benjamin, has one nodding flower, with an unpleasant odor, rising on a stalk above the leaves.
+Living Room Love+
Persian shield. Persian Shield is known botanically as Strobilanthes dyerianus. It is native to Burma and has 8-inch-long leaves that are iridescent in shades of purple, lilac and pink, with purple-maroon on the undersides. If those colors aren't awesome enough, the foliage looks like it has a light coat of silver electroplated to it.    Although newly in fashion. the plant has been used in gardens since Victorian times. by Danielle 5026
Danielle 5026
Danielle 5026 Persian shield. Persian Shield is known botanically as Strobilanthes dyerianus. It is native to Burma and has 8-inch-long leaves that are iridescent in shades of purple, lilac and pink, with purple-maroon on the undersides. If those colors aren't awesome enough, the foliage looks like it has a light coat of silver electroplated to it. Although newly in fashion. the plant has been used in gardens since Victorian times.
flowers
Persian shield. Persian Shield is known botanically as Strobilanthes dyerianus. It is native to Burma and has 8-inch-long leaves that are iridescent in shades of purple, lilac and pink, with purple-maroon on the undersides. If those colors aren't awesome enough, the foliage looks like it has a light coat of silver electroplated to it.    Although newly in fashion. the plant has been used in gardens since Victorian times. by Ti@n@h
Ti@n@h
Ti@n@h Persian shield. Persian Shield is known botanically as Strobilanthes dyerianus. It is native to Burma and has 8-inch-long leaves that are iridescent in shades of purple, lilac and pink, with purple-maroon on the undersides. If those colors aren't awesome enough, the foliage looks like it has a light coat of silver electroplated to it. Although newly in fashion. the plant has been used in gardens since Victorian times.
Beauty Nature
Mari Lynn’s Armeria’(ARMERIA maritima Compacta).  Armeria are also known as: ”Lady’s Cushion”, “thrift”, or “sea pink” (this last one because as they are often found on coastlines).  You will love the tidy mound of grass like foliage and abundance of rose-pink spherical flowers that float above the plant. If kept deadheaded, you can enjoy it’s pink globe flowers all summer long. by jeannine
jeannine
jeannine Mari Lynn’s Armeria’(ARMERIA maritima Compacta).  Armeria are also known as: ”Lady’s Cushion”, “thrift”, or “sea pink” (this last one because as they are often found on coastlines).  You will love the tidy mound of grass like foliage and abundance of rose-pink spherical flowers that float above the plant. If kept deadheaded, you can enjoy it’s pink globe flowers all summer long.
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Celery Root  Celeriac (also known as celery root), is a knobby-shaped bulb that often has smaller, spider-like root protrusions. So gross by jill
jill
jill Celery Root Celeriac (also known as celery root), is a knobby-shaped bulb that often has smaller, spider-like root protrusions. So gross
+Living Room Love+
Queen Anne's Lace, also called "Wild Carrot," is a common plant in dry fields, ditches, and open areas. It was introduced from Europe, and the carrots that we eat today were once cultivated from this plant. Queen Anne's Lace grows up to four feet tall. Its leaves are two to eight inches long and fern-like. This plant is best known for its flowers, which are tiny and white, blooming in lacy, flat-topped clusters. Each little flower has a dark, by laohu
laohu
laohu Queen Anne's Lace, also called "Wild Carrot," is a common plant in dry fields, ditches, and open areas. It was introduced from Europe, and the carrots that we eat today were once cultivated from this plant. Queen Anne's Lace grows up to four feet tall. Its leaves are two to eight inches long and fern-like. This plant is best known for its flowers, which are tiny and white, blooming in lacy, flat-topped clusters. Each little flower has a dark,
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Switchgrass: A lovely North American native prairie grass, switchgrass offers the garden beauty and easy maintenance. Varieties grow from 2 to 6 feet tall and have airy, cloudlike plumes. Some varieties have rich red or purple foliage in autumn. by amandawest
amandawest
amandawest Switchgrass: A lovely North American native prairie grass, switchgrass offers the garden beauty and easy maintenance. Varieties grow from 2 to 6 feet tall and have airy, cloudlike plumes. Some varieties have rich red or purple foliage in autumn.
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A thick curtain separated the Holy of Holies from the Holy Place. This curtain, known as the “veil,” was made of fine linen and blue, purple and scarlet yarn. There were figures of cherubim (angels) embroidered onto it. Cherubim, spirits who serve God, were in the presence of God to demonstrate His almighty power and majesty.  They also guarded the throne of God. These cherubim were also on the innermost layer of covering of the tent. If one by kerri_posts
kerri_posts
kerri_posts A thick curtain separated the Holy of Holies from the Holy Place. This curtain, known as the “veil,” was made of fine linen and blue, purple and scarlet yarn. There were figures of cherubim (angels) embroidered onto it. Cherubim, spirits who serve God, were in the presence of God to demonstrate His almighty power and majesty. They also guarded the throne of God. These cherubim were also on the innermost layer of covering of the tent. If one
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New England Aster. This lovely fall blooming perennial is native to most of the US, and its blue, purple & white flowers are adorning the roadsides now. This tall species can be cut back in early summer to control its presence in the garden. Also known as Michaelmas daisy, it is a long-lasting cut flower with many hybrid varieties available in various shades of pink and purple. by jana
jana
jana New England Aster. This lovely fall blooming perennial is native to most of the US, and its blue, purple & white flowers are adorning the roadsides now. This tall species can be cut back in early summer to control its presence in the garden. Also known as Michaelmas daisy, it is a long-lasting cut flower with many hybrid varieties available in various shades of pink and purple.
In the Garden
The Red-headed Vulture (Sarcogyps calvus), also known as the Asian King Vulture, Indian Black Vulture. The adult has a prominent deep red to orange naked head. It frequents open country, well-wooded hills and dry deciduous forest with rivers. The disappearance of vultures is linked to intensification of agriculture, increased sophistication of waste disposal and disease. Decline in numbers is due to pharmaceuticals used to treat livestock, which has led to their mortality from renal failure. by marisol
marisol
marisol The Red-headed Vulture (Sarcogyps calvus), also known as the Asian King Vulture, Indian Black Vulture. The adult has a prominent deep red to orange naked head. It frequents open country, well-wooded hills and dry deciduous forest with rivers. The disappearance of vultures is linked to intensification of agriculture, increased sophistication of waste disposal and disease. Decline in numbers is due to pharmaceuticals used to treat livestock, which has led to their mortality from renal failure.
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The dwarf fountain grass 'Hameln' is effective when used as a low-facing plant in a mixed border with heleniums, purple salvia, and willow bluestar (Amsonia spp.). Here it's been combined with tall feather reed grass to accent a stone wall. Both catch the late afternoon light in a delightful way.  Use for erosion control on slopes to mitigate runoff. Fountain grass also makes a good choice for naturalistic meadows and sweeps where low maintenance is desired. by Danielle 5026
Danielle 5026
Danielle 5026 The dwarf fountain grass 'Hameln' is effective when used as a low-facing plant in a mixed border with heleniums, purple salvia, and willow bluestar (Amsonia spp.). Here it's been combined with tall feather reed grass to accent a stone wall. Both catch the late afternoon light in a delightful way. Use for erosion control on slopes to mitigate runoff. Fountain grass also makes a good choice for naturalistic meadows and sweeps where low maintenance is desired.
garden
I want this stuff if the description is true. The very tiny Irish Moss seeds create a moss-like, emerald-green foliage that forms a compact 1 - 2 inch tall carpet. Sagina Subulata ground cover is excellent for planting between flagstones. Grown as a lawn substitute, it creates the effect of a moss-covered meadow. Irish Moss is very soft to walk on barefoot, and it has a slightly spongy feel to it. by lakisha
lakisha
lakisha I want this stuff if the description is true. The very tiny Irish Moss seeds create a moss-like, emerald-green foliage that forms a compact 1 - 2 inch tall carpet. Sagina Subulata ground cover is excellent for planting between flagstones. Grown as a lawn substitute, it creates the effect of a moss-covered meadow. Irish Moss is very soft to walk on barefoot, and it has a slightly spongy feel to it.
Gardens and landscaping
This scarecrow is made on an 18 inch straw hat. It is approximately 9 inches deep. On top of the hat are fall leaves, acorns, and berries. It has moveable eyes, a corn cob nose, and a brown felt mouth. The hair is raffia and has leaves in it that look like they have just fallen from the tree. There is a gold and orange bow under the neck. by april
april
april This scarecrow is made on an 18 inch straw hat. It is approximately 9 inches deep. On top of the hat are fall leaves, acorns, and berries. It has moveable eyes, a corn cob nose, and a brown felt mouth. The hair is raffia and has leaves in it that look like they have just fallen from the tree. There is a gold and orange bow under the neck.
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Morris Day, musician, composer and actor. He is best known as the lead singer of The Time. He also played the antagonist to Prince in films Purple Rain and Graffiti Bridge, which helped establish Day's playboy stage presence. Typically escorted by his valet, Jerome (Jerome Benton), he won fans with his exaggerated vanity ("Jerome bring me my mirror!") and bravado ("Ain't nobody bad like me!"), acting as a comic foil to Prince's romantic, by celina.neo
celina.neo
celina.neo Morris Day, musician, composer and actor. He is best known as the lead singer of The Time. He also played the antagonist to Prince in films Purple Rain and Graffiti Bridge, which helped establish Day's playboy stage presence. Typically escorted by his valet, Jerome (Jerome Benton), he won fans with his exaggerated vanity ("Jerome bring me my mirror!") and bravado ("Ain't nobody bad like me!"), acting as a comic foil to Prince's romantic,
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Also known as frozen smoke, Aerogel is the world's lowest density solid, clocking in at 96% air. It's basically just a gel made from silicon, except all the liquid has been taken out and replaced with gas instead. If you hold a small piece in your hand, it's practically impossible to either see or feel, but if you poke it, it's like styrofoam.  It supports up to 4,000 times its own weight and can withstand a blast from two pounds of dynamite. by Maiden11976
Maiden11976
Maiden11976 Also known as frozen smoke, Aerogel is the world's lowest density solid, clocking in at 96% air. It's basically just a gel made from silicon, except all the liquid has been taken out and replaced with gas instead. If you hold a small piece in your hand, it's practically impossible to either see or feel, but if you poke it, it's like styrofoam. It supports up to 4,000 times its own weight and can withstand a blast from two pounds of dynamite.
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Side-swept bangs:::  No matter what length your hair, side-swept bangs like Emma Stone's will make a big statement. "Emma has a deep side part and the bangs cut down at a strong angle to the tip of her nose, so you get the dramatic effect while also blending seamlessly into the rest of the hair," he says. As these grow out, it's very easy to transition into Olivia Wilde's face-framing look. by hope21
hope21
hope21 Side-swept bangs::: No matter what length your hair, side-swept bangs like Emma Stone's will make a big statement. "Emma has a deep side part and the bangs cut down at a strong angle to the tip of her nose, so you get the dramatic effect while also blending seamlessly into the rest of the hair," he says. As these grow out, it's very easy to transition into Olivia Wilde's face-framing look.
i love hair!!
The Hoia-Baciu Forest is located near Cluj-Napoca, Romania and is locally referred to as the Bermuda Triangle of Romania. Hoia Baciu Forest has a reputation for paranormal activity. Reports have included, among others, folk ghost stories, apparitions, faces identified in photographs that were not visible with the naked eye, and, in the 1970s, UFO sightings. Visitors to the forest report anxiety and the feeling of being watched, and the local vegetation is oftentimes bizarre (strangely shaped trees, charring on tree stumps and branches).  The forest was named after a shepherd that disappeared in the area with two hundred sheep. Most people who live near the forest are afraid to enter. They believe that those who visit the site will never return. Many of the locals who have gone into the forest complain of physical harm, including rashes, nausea, vomiting, migraines, burns, scratches, anxiety, and other unusual bodily sensations. This dense forest first gained notoriety in the late 1960s when biologist Alexandru Sift snapped several amazing photos of flying disc-shaped objects in the skies above the forest canopy.  People who enter the forest inexplicably get rashes or begin to feel very light-headed and become ill. Also electronic devices are known to inexplicably malfunction in the area. Some paranormal investigators associate these unknown malfunctioning with supernatural activity. The Hoia-Baciu Forest has a reputation for paranormal activity. People have witnessed several strange events on the land. The most common phenomenon includes seeing mysterious orb-like lights, female voices, giggling, apparitions, and cases of people being scratched. In the 1970s, the area was a hotbed for UFO sighting and unexplained lights. Visitors to the forest have reported a strong sense of anxiety and the feeling of being watched. The local vegetation in the forest is bizarre and some trees hold an unexplained charring. On August 18, 1968, a military technician named Emil Barnea captured a famous photograph of a saucer-like object over the Hoia-Baciu Forest.  Some believe that the forest is the gateway to another dimension. Several stories are often told that exhibit people entering the forest and experiencing missing time with no recollection of how they spent that time. One such story focuses on a 5-year-old girl who wonders into the forest and gets lost. She reemerges from the forest 5 years older still wearing the untarnished clothes that she wore on the day she disappeared with no memory of where she had been. Another story of the The Hoia-Baciu Forest is the site of strange paranormal phenomena which have been recorded and researched for nearly 50 years. The woods are thought to be notoriously haunted by the Romanian peasants who were murdered here. It is believed that the souls of these ghosts are trapped within the wooded confines of Hoia-Baciu and that the ghosts are enraged by their predicament. Within the dark interior, people have been known to disappear, strange lights have been seen, the wind seems to speak, and visions of these tormented spirits are observed by terrified travelers. Pairs of green eyes and a black fog have been observed here and many people report a feeling of being watched as they travel near the forest’s edge. Locals also believe that there is a hub for this paranormal activity— a circular plateau deep in the forest which is devoid of trees and which is thought to be the “home” of these ghosts (Pictured at the top). Photos taken here have been developed to reveal hovering shapes and outlines of human forms. More recently the paranormal energy of the forest has taken on the form of poltergeist and ghost activity. In one paranormal television series an investigator in the forest is scratched and thrown on the ground, when he returned 2 years later, he was again attacked leaving his left ear bleeding from a broken eardrum. People also claim to see bright lights within the woods. This paranormal activity seems to be focused in an inexplicable clearing in the forest that is a vegetation dead zone. It is nearly a perfect circle in the woods where nothing will grow. Soil samples have been taken from the site and analyzed but results show that there is nothing in the soil that should prevent the growth of plant life. by florence
florence
florence The Hoia-Baciu Forest is located near Cluj-Napoca, Romania and is locally referred to as the Bermuda Triangle of Romania. Hoia Baciu Forest has a reputation for paranormal activity. Reports have included, among others, folk ghost stories, apparitions, faces identified in photographs that were not visible with the naked eye, and, in the 1970s, UFO sightings. Visitors to the forest report anxiety and the feeling of being watched, and the local vegetation is oftentimes bizarre (strangely shaped trees, charring on tree stumps and branches). The forest was named after a shepherd that disappeared in the area with two hundred sheep. Most people who live near the forest are afraid to enter. They believe that those who visit the site will never return. Many of the locals who have gone into the forest complain of physical harm, including rashes, nausea, vomiting, migraines, burns, scratches, anxiety, and other unusual bodily sensations. This dense forest first gained notoriety in the late 1960s when biologist Alexandru Sift snapped several amazing photos of flying disc-shaped objects in the skies above the forest canopy. People who enter the forest inexplicably get rashes or begin to feel very light-headed and become ill. Also electronic devices are known to inexplicably malfunction in the area. Some paranormal investigators associate these unknown malfunctioning with supernatural activity. The Hoia-Baciu Forest has a reputation for paranormal activity. People have witnessed several strange events on the land. The most common phenomenon includes seeing mysterious orb-like lights, female voices, giggling, apparitions, and cases of people being scratched. In the 1970s, the area was a hotbed for UFO sighting and unexplained lights. Visitors to the forest have reported a strong sense of anxiety and the feeling of being watched. The local vegetation in the forest is bizarre and some trees hold an unexplained charring. On August 18, 1968, a military technician named Emil Barnea captured a famous photograph of a saucer-like object over the Hoia-Baciu Forest. Some believe that the forest is the gateway to another dimension. Several stories are often told that exhibit people entering the forest and experiencing missing time with no recollection of how they spent that time. One such story focuses on a 5-year-old girl who wonders into the forest and gets lost. She reemerges from the forest 5 years older still wearing the untarnished clothes that she wore on the day she disappeared with no memory of where she had been. Another story of the The Hoia-Baciu Forest is the site of strange paranormal phenomena which have been recorded and researched for nearly 50 years. The woods are thought to be notoriously haunted by the Romanian peasants who were murdered here. It is believed that the souls of these ghosts are trapped within the wooded confines of Hoia-Baciu and that the ghosts are enraged by their predicament. Within the dark interior, people have been known to disappear, strange lights have been seen, the wind seems to speak, and visions of these tormented spirits are observed by terrified travelers. Pairs of green eyes and a black fog have been observed here and many people report a feeling of being watched as they travel near the forest’s edge. Locals also believe that there is a hub for this paranormal activity— a circular plateau deep in the forest which is devoid of trees and which is thought to be the “home” of these ghosts (Pictured at the top). Photos taken here have been developed to reveal hovering shapes and outlines of human forms. More recently the paranormal energy of the forest has taken on the form of poltergeist and ghost activity. In one paranormal television series an investigator in the forest is scratched and thrown on the ground, when he returned 2 years later, he was again attacked leaving his left ear bleeding from a broken eardrum. People also claim to see bright lights within the woods. This paranormal activity seems to be focused in an inexplicable clearing in the forest that is a vegetation dead zone. It is nearly a perfect circle in the woods where nothing will grow. Soil samples have been taken from the site and analyzed but results show that there is nothing in the soil that should prevent the growth of plant life.
just sayin
While there's no right or wrong way to blog, great content is the key to  blogging success. But share-worthy content isn't always easy to come up  with or create, is it? Today I'm coming to the rescue with 50 blog post  ideas that you can use to provide your readers with quality content and  keep them coming back for more.     1. Share a behind-the-scenes look of your blog or business. Everyone       loves getting sneak peeks of what your office looks like, photos of       things "in the works," and looks at rough drafts. Michaela Noelle did       this on her blog last week and it was a great success! It also adds a       little personality to your blog and allows your readers to connect       with you.    2. Write a blog series on your process. I did this with my creative       process last month and it was a huge hit. Readers love to find out       how you do what you do, so highlight each step of a project in a blog       series and walk them through your process. This is helpful for       readers who are in a similar field and for potential clients and       customers.     3. Roundup helpful posts and link to other bloggers. Readers also like       finding out which blogs you follow along with and what posts you find       interesting, so link to other bloggers and share articles and posts       that might be helpful for your audience. (This is also a great way to       connect and network with other bloggers. I can see which bloggers       refer to me in my analytics and I almost always reach out to them!)        Jenny Purr does a great job with link-ups.    4. Write a post on how you got started. We all love a good success       story. Share your experience and tell your readers how you got here.       Plus, it's fun to document your journey and remember where you       started. And on that note...    5. Share tips on how to become successful in your industry. Which       resources and advice have helped you get to where you are? Don't keep       all of those tips to yourself - share the love with your readers!    6. Feature a professional in your field. This could take the form of       reaching out to someone for a Q&A on your blog (like this Coffee Date       with Molly Jaques) or just highlighting someone in your industry that       you admire. This is also a great networking opportunity.    7. Host a giveaway. Readers love getting free things, whether it's       content, entertainment, or goodies. Create excitement around your       blog and reward your readers for following along with you by hosting       a giveaway! Giveaways are also great marketing tools for your blog.     8. Write a polarizing post about something you may not agree with in       your field. While it's easy for all of us to go along with the crowd       and do what's popular, there may be some things in your industry that       you want to do differently. Write about it! (Please note that I'm not       promoting negativity, complaining, ranting, or bashing - there's a       way to go about this tastefully and respectfully.) Here are some       great polarizing posts: Time for Change, 3 things I'm no longer doing       for my website, One Word That May Be Hindering Your Business    9. Make a list of things you wish you had known when ... Hindsight is       20/20 and we all have the opportunity to learn from others' mistakes.       Share a handful of things you wish you had known when you first       started blogging, writing, designing, doing calligraphy,       photographing weddings, etc. Need an example? Read this post.    10. Share a day-in-the-life post. We all like to see how successful       people go about their day. Write down your day (without going into       too much detail) and give your readers an insider look! Breanna Rose       does this in her Creative Diaries series, and they are some of my       favorite posts.   11. Ask someone to guest post about something specific in your industry.        We never have all the answers and it's fun to get advice from other       people that are doing great things in your field. It's also fun to       highlight talented people and bring attention to their business. You       could even look at it as a networking and marketing opportunity and       do a trade - ask someone to guest post on your blog in return for       guest posting on theirs.    12. Write an informational post about your blogging platform. Readers       love learning about how you do what you do. Write a review of your       blogging platform, the things you like and don't like, and whether or       not you would recommend it. This post about Squarespace has been one       of my most popular posts and I continue to get emails and feedback       about it!   13. Roundup and highlight the tools you use in your trade. I said it in       #12 but it's worth repeating: readers love learning how you do what       you do. Make a list of things you use everyday and share it on the       blog! Here's my example.   14. Teach your readers about something you're an expert in. We all love       to learn from the pros and get insider information. Content like this       will be shared over and over again and gain a lot of feedback.   15. Share some takeaways from a recent experience, workshop, or event.        Have you attended an event related to your field in the last few       months? Share it on the blog and highlight your favorite moments!       Your readers will love reading about your experience and the       workshop/conference may even share your post, too.   16. Make a list of things people should avoid in your industry.        Sometimes it's even more helpful to learn about what not to do.       Share some common mistakes that people make and how to avoid them. I       was a little leery of sharing my Top 10 Design Mistakes to Avoid, but       I was pleasantly surprised by the feedback!   17. Highlight milestones, launches, and important events. It's always       good to have a reason for people to get excited about your       blog/business. Make a big deal out of changes and events by featuring       them on the blog!   18. Explain the meaning behind your blog/business name. Some names are       straightforward, but some have a fun story behind them. Turn it into       a blog post and share the story behind your blog/business name. (The       meaning of the Elle & Company is mentioned in this post.)   19. Feature the people you work with. It's rare that we run a blog or       business completely on our own; there are usually people who work for       us or with us to help us keep things running, even if it's just by       their encouragement. Use your blog to highlight them, promote them,       and feature their work. I featured my biggest fan and business       partner a few months ago, and it's one of my favorite posts to-date.   20. Make a list of things people may not know about your trade. There's       always information out there that people are surprised to hear. For       example, non-designers may not know that using Comic Sans is one of       the biggest no-no's in this industry. Create a list of "did you know"       items and share it with your readers. I guarantee it will be a hit.   21. Write a review of a product you use often. If you're a photographer,       write about your favorite lenses. If you're a designer, share about       your favorite software. If you're an entrepreneur, share the programs       you use for project management and accounting. People are always on       the lookout for helpful products and tools - share your feedback with       them.    22. Repurpose old blog posts with a roundup. Chances are that you've       spent hours on blog posts that are now buried in your archives. Share       them again by doing a roundup! A Beautiful Mess does this at the end       of every month to highlight their posts and I did this recently with       my Weekly Truth backgrounds. Don't let those great posts go to       waste.    23. Repurpose an old blog post with a follow-up. Can you add onto       something you've already done? Write a sequel or a "part 2" to an old       blog post and make use out of that content again.   24. Repurpose an old blog post with a revision. Do you have a post that       you wrote a couple years ago that could be revamped or reused? Make       some revisions and post it again!   25. Share about how you use a certain social media outlet for your       blog/business. There are so many social media outlets out there and       everyone uses them a little differently. Share about one of your       favorites and give your readers tips on how you use it for your       blog/business. Here are some examples of posts I've done on        Instagram and Pinterest.   26. Turn an FAQ or inquiry into a blog post. Is there a common question       that readers ask you by email or in your post comments? Turn it into       a blog post! An email from an Elle & Company reader regarding content       actually inspired this blog post. If it's something that multiple       readers have asked you about, chances are their are more people who       would love to know more about it, too.   27. Tell an interesting story. We all love a good tale and we all enjoy       being entertained. Do you have a "you're not going to believe this"       story? Share it on your blog!   28. Write an informative post on how people can work best with you. Are       you a calligrapher, photographer, or wedding planner? Share some tips       for brides on how to make the process as simple as possible. Are you       an interior designer? Share some insights on how clients and       designers can maintain a great working relationship. This is helpful       for current and future clients and it's also helpful for those in       your field who are just getting started.   29. Create and share a free resource. We all love free things. That's why       we follow along with blogs in the first place! Find creative ways to       share free resources with your audience. I do this with my Weekly       Truth series and it's been a hit (especially on Pinterest!)    30. Find a creative way to link up with other bloggers/business owners.        There are several ways you can go about this one. You could create a       writing challenge like Bailey did with her Blogtember series, start a       fun linkup like What I Wore Wednesday, or partner with another blog       friend like Michaela and I did for the Home Suite Home project. The       possibilities are endless, so get creative and come up with something       distinctly you!   31. Create a blog series on a project. People love following along with       step-by-step transformations (that's why Young House Love was my       favorite blog for so many years!). Are you working on a project for a       client, remodeling your home, or training for a marathon? Share about       it on the blog and show sneak peeks of the transformation as you go.   32. Highlight one of your products or services. This is your blog; use it       to your advantage! Come up with creative ways to highlight your       business and your products. This could take the shape of a "how-to"       post or you could pose them as a solution to a particular problem.   33. Create an infographic. Not only are graphics and photos more       interesting and entertaining, they're sharable. Even if you aren't       able to draw one yourself, compile information on a topic in your       field and come up with a creative way to display it. I did this with       the feedback I received from a reader survey this past summer and        the infographic was a hit! Which perfectly transitions into my next       idea...   34. Take a reader survey and come up with a unique way to share the       results. Not only is this feedback helpful for you, but readers like       to see who else is following along with you. A Beautiful Mess and        Young House Love always do this well.    35. Share your mission statement and blog/business strategy. Write a post       on what's at the heart of your blog or business. Why do you do what       you do? What motivates you?   36. Define or share your take on your industry. For example, many people       use the term "branding" but designers approach that subject       differently depending on who you talk to. I wrote a post on branding        after I officially launched my design services this past summer       to approach the subject in my own terms. Do you have your own take on       your field? Share it on your blog!   37. Find a creative way to share tidbits of your life lately. There are a       million and ten ways you could approach this, so come up with       something original! Some of my favorite examples include Awkward and       Awesome and Clara Conversations.   38. Create a "through the years" or flashback post. Is there a tradition       or event that you participate in year after year? Your readers would       probably love to see it on your blog. An example?  This post by       Justin and Mary on their past Halloween costumes.    39. Give away some secrets of your trade. Many people shy away from       sharing the information that has made them successful for fear that       it could create competition, but it's had the opposite effect in my       experience. Share what you know! If you do what you do well, you'll       have nothing to worry about. Readers will love gaining your great       insight and information.    40. Teach people how to make something unique. We all have a DIY board on       Pinterest, don't we? There's something in each one of us that loves       learning how to make something that we wouldn't have thought to make       before.    41. Write about some common misconceptions in your industry. Are there       things that people assume about your business or trade that aren't       accurate? Address them in a blog post!   42. Ask your readers for feedback. Do you have a question or dilemma? Let       your readers participate by sharing it on the blog. Michaela did this       with her readers in our Home Suite Home project when she asked them       to vote on which design concepts they liked best.   43. Share your sources of inspiration. We see this all over the place on       blogs, but think of your own creative way to make an inspiration post       distinctly your own. I do this on my blog a couple time each month       in Today's Top 3.    44. Solve a problem. Is there a particular issue that keeps coming up in       your industry time and again? Provide a solution to it! Some       examples? Braid Creative wrote a post on organizational tools for       creative entrepreneurs and Ashley wrote a post for photographers on       organizing their email inbox.   45. Write a post on the best (or worst!) advice you've ever received.        This could be both helpful and hilarious for your audience.    46. Highlight the best (or worst!) moments since starting your       blog/business. Again, this could be both helpful and hilarious for       your audience.   47. Share your recent projects. Blogging is a great marketing tool. Use       it to your advantage and highlight your latest work! Not only is it       fun for your readers to follow along with, but you never know if       potential customers are following along with you. Think of it as free       advertising for your portfolio.    48. Share a testimonial or success story. It could be about your       experience with another professional or a clients' experience with       you. Word of mouth is the best advertisement.   49. Surprise your readers with something unexpected. Do you have a hidden       talent or trait that your readers might not know about? Find a way to       highlight it on your blog! I did this in my "That's a Rap" post and       although it was totally random, it gave my readers a glimpse of my       personality outside of blogging and designing.   50. Create a long list of something specific to your       trade/blog/industry/field. Case in point.   That's a wrap! Which ideas are you most excited to try? Do you have any  suggestions for no-fluff, content-rich blog posts that I may not have  mentioned? by Joao.Almeida.d.Eca
Joao.Almeida.d.Eca
Joao.Almeida.d.Eca While there's no right or wrong way to blog, great content is the key to blogging success. But share-worthy content isn't always easy to come up with or create, is it? Today I'm coming to the rescue with 50 blog post ideas that you can use to provide your readers with quality content and keep them coming back for more. 1. Share a behind-the-scenes look of your blog or business. Everyone loves getting sneak peeks of what your office looks like, photos of things "in the works," and looks at rough drafts. Michaela Noelle did this on her blog last week and it was a great success! It also adds a little personality to your blog and allows your readers to connect with you. 2. Write a blog series on your process. I did this with my creative process last month and it was a huge hit. Readers love to find out how you do what you do, so highlight each step of a project in a blog series and walk them through your process. This is helpful for readers who are in a similar field and for potential clients and customers.  3. Roundup helpful posts and link to other bloggers. Readers also like finding out which blogs you follow along with and what posts you find interesting, so link to other bloggers and share articles and posts that might be helpful for your audience. (This is also a great way to connect and network with other bloggers. I can see which bloggers refer to me in my analytics and I almost always reach out to them!) Jenny Purr does a great job with link-ups. 4. Write a post on how you got started. We all love a good success story. Share your experience and tell your readers how you got here. Plus, it's fun to document your journey and remember where you started. And on that note... 5. Share tips on how to become successful in your industry. Which resources and advice have helped you get to where you are? Don't keep all of those tips to yourself - share the love with your readers! 6. Feature a professional in your field. This could take the form of reaching out to someone for a Q&A on your blog (like this Coffee Date with Molly Jaques) or just highlighting someone in your industry that you admire. This is also a great networking opportunity. 7. Host a giveaway. Readers love getting free things, whether it's content, entertainment, or goodies. Create excitement around your blog and reward your readers for following along with you by hosting a giveaway! Giveaways are also great marketing tools for your blog.  8. Write a polarizing post about something you may not agree with in your field. While it's easy for all of us to go along with the crowd and do what's popular, there may be some things in your industry that you want to do differently. Write about it! (Please note that I'm not promoting negativity, complaining, ranting, or bashing - there's a way to go about this tastefully and respectfully.) Here are some great polarizing posts: Time for Change, 3 things I'm no longer doing for my website, One Word That May Be Hindering Your Business 9. Make a list of things you wish you had known when ... Hindsight is 20/20 and we all have the opportunity to learn from others' mistakes. Share a handful of things you wish you had known when you first started blogging, writing, designing, doing calligraphy, photographing weddings, etc. Need an example? Read this post.  10. Share a day-in-the-life post. We all like to see how successful people go about their day. Write down your day (without going into too much detail) and give your readers an insider look! Breanna Rose does this in her Creative Diaries series, and they are some of my favorite posts. 11. Ask someone to guest post about something specific in your industry.  We never have all the answers and it's fun to get advice from other people that are doing great things in your field. It's also fun to highlight talented people and bring attention to their business. You could even look at it as a networking and marketing opportunity and do a trade - ask someone to guest post on your blog in return for guest posting on theirs.  12. Write an informational post about your blogging platform. Readers love learning about how you do what you do. Write a review of your blogging platform, the things you like and don't like, and whether or not you would recommend it. This post about Squarespace has been one of my most popular posts and I continue to get emails and feedback about it! 13. Roundup and highlight the tools you use in your trade. I said it in #12 but it's worth repeating: readers love learning how you do what you do. Make a list of things you use everyday and share it on the blog! Here's my example. 14. Teach your readers about something you're an expert in. We all love to learn from the pros and get insider information. Content like this will be shared over and over again and gain a lot of feedback. 15. Share some takeaways from a recent experience, workshop, or event.  Have you attended an event related to your field in the last few months? Share it on the blog and highlight your favorite moments! Your readers will love reading about your experience and the workshop/conference may even share your post, too. 16. Make a list of things people should avoid in your industry.  Sometimes it's even more helpful to learn about what not to do. Share some common mistakes that people make and how to avoid them. I was a little leery of sharing my Top 10 Design Mistakes to Avoid, but I was pleasantly surprised by the feedback! 17. Highlight milestones, launches, and important events. It's always good to have a reason for people to get excited about your blog/business. Make a big deal out of changes and events by featuring them on the blog! 18. Explain the meaning behind your blog/business name. Some names are straightforward, but some have a fun story behind them. Turn it into a blog post and share the story behind your blog/business name. (The meaning of the Elle & Company is mentioned in this post.) 19. Feature the people you work with. It's rare that we run a blog or business completely on our own; there are usually people who work for us or with us to help us keep things running, even if it's just by their encouragement. Use your blog to highlight them, promote them, and feature their work. I featured my biggest fan and business partner a few months ago, and it's one of my favorite posts to-date. 20. Make a list of things people may not know about your trade. There's always information out there that people are surprised to hear. For example, non-designers may not know that using Comic Sans is one of the biggest no-no's in this industry. Create a list of "did you know" items and share it with your readers. I guarantee it will be a hit. 21. Write a review of a product you use often. If you're a photographer, write about your favorite lenses. If you're a designer, share about your favorite software. If you're an entrepreneur, share the programs you use for project management and accounting. People are always on the lookout for helpful products and tools - share your feedback with them.  22. Repurpose old blog posts with a roundup. Chances are that you've spent hours on blog posts that are now buried in your archives. Share them again by doing a roundup! A Beautiful Mess does this at the end of every month to highlight their posts and I did this recently with my Weekly Truth backgrounds. Don't let those great posts go to waste.  23. Repurpose an old blog post with a follow-up. Can you add onto something you've already done? Write a sequel or a "part 2" to an old blog post and make use out of that content again. 24. Repurpose an old blog post with a revision. Do you have a post that you wrote a couple years ago that could be revamped or reused? Make some revisions and post it again! 25. Share about how you use a certain social media outlet for your blog/business. There are so many social media outlets out there and everyone uses them a little differently. Share about one of your favorites and give your readers tips on how you use it for your blog/business. Here are some examples of posts I've done on Instagram and Pinterest. 26. Turn an FAQ or inquiry into a blog post. Is there a common question that readers ask you by email or in your post comments? Turn it into a blog post! An email from an Elle & Company reader regarding content actually inspired this blog post. If it's something that multiple readers have asked you about, chances are their are more people who would love to know more about it, too. 27. Tell an interesting story. We all love a good tale and we all enjoy being entertained. Do you have a "you're not going to believe this" story? Share it on your blog! 28. Write an informative post on how people can work best with you. Are you a calligrapher, photographer, or wedding planner? Share some tips for brides on how to make the process as simple as possible. Are you an interior designer? Share some insights on how clients and designers can maintain a great working relationship. This is helpful for current and future clients and it's also helpful for those in your field who are just getting started. 29. Create and share a free resource. We all love free things. That's why we follow along with blogs in the first place! Find creative ways to share free resources with your audience. I do this with my Weekly Truth series and it's been a hit (especially on Pinterest!)  30. Find a creative way to link up with other bloggers/business owners.  There are several ways you can go about this one. You could create a writing challenge like Bailey did with her Blogtember series, start a fun linkup like What I Wore Wednesday, or partner with another blog friend like Michaela and I did for the Home Suite Home project. The possibilities are endless, so get creative and come up with something distinctly you! 31. Create a blog series on a project. People love following along with step-by-step transformations (that's why Young House Love was my favorite blog for so many years!). Are you working on a project for a client, remodeling your home, or training for a marathon? Share about it on the blog and show sneak peeks of the transformation as you go. 32. Highlight one of your products or services. This is your blog; use it to your advantage! Come up with creative ways to highlight your business and your products. This could take the shape of a "how-to" post or you could pose them as a solution to a particular problem. 33. Create an infographic. Not only are graphics and photos more interesting and entertaining, they're sharable. Even if you aren't able to draw one yourself, compile information on a topic in your field and come up with a creative way to display it. I did this with the feedback I received from a reader survey this past summer and the infographic was a hit! Which perfectly transitions into my next idea... 34. Take a reader survey and come up with a unique way to share the results. Not only is this feedback helpful for you, but readers like to see who else is following along with you. A Beautiful Mess and Young House Love always do this well.  35. Share your mission statement and blog/business strategy. Write a post on what's at the heart of your blog or business. Why do you do what you do? What motivates you? 36. Define or share your take on your industry. For example, many people use the term "branding" but designers approach that subject differently depending on who you talk to. I wrote a post on branding after I officially launched my design services this past summer to approach the subject in my own terms. Do you have your own take on your field? Share it on your blog! 37. Find a creative way to share tidbits of your life lately. There are a million and ten ways you could approach this, so come up with something original! Some of my favorite examples include Awkward and Awesome and Clara Conversations. 38. Create a "through the years" or flashback post. Is there a tradition or event that you participate in year after year? Your readers would probably love to see it on your blog. An example?  This post by Justin and Mary on their past Halloween costumes.  39. Give away some secrets of your trade. Many people shy away from sharing the information that has made them successful for fear that it could create competition, but it's had the opposite effect in my experience. Share what you know! If you do what you do well, you'll have nothing to worry about. Readers will love gaining your great insight and information.  40. Teach people how to make something unique. We all have a DIY board on Pinterest, don't we? There's something in each one of us that loves learning how to make something that we wouldn't have thought to make before.  41. Write about some common misconceptions in your industry. Are there things that people assume about your business or trade that aren't accurate? Address them in a blog post! 42. Ask your readers for feedback. Do you have a question or dilemma? Let your readers participate by sharing it on the blog. Michaela did this with her readers in our Home Suite Home project when she asked them to vote on which design concepts they liked best. 43. Share your sources of inspiration. We see this all over the place on blogs, but think of your own creative way to make an inspiration post distinctly your own. I do this on my blog a couple time each month in Today's Top 3.  44. Solve a problem. Is there a particular issue that keeps coming up in your industry time and again? Provide a solution to it! Some examples? Braid Creative wrote a post on organizational tools for creative entrepreneurs and Ashley wrote a post for photographers on organizing their email inbox. 45. Write a post on the best (or worst!) advice you've ever received. This could be both helpful and hilarious for your audience.  46. Highlight the best (or worst!) moments since starting your blog/business. Again, this could be both helpful and hilarious for your audience. 47. Share your recent projects. Blogging is a great marketing tool. Use it to your advantage and highlight your latest work! Not only is it fun for your readers to follow along with, but you never know if potential customers are following along with you. Think of it as free advertising for your portfolio.  48. Share a testimonial or success story. It could be about your experience with another professional or a clients' experience with you. Word of mouth is the best advertisement. 49. Surprise your readers with something unexpected. Do you have a hidden talent or trait that your readers might not know about? Find a way to highlight it on your blog! I did this in my "That's a Rap" post and although it was totally random, it gave my readers a glimpse of my personality outside of blogging and designing. 50. Create a long list of something specific to your trade/blog/industry/field. Case in point. That's a wrap! Which ideas are you most excited to try? Do you have any suggestions for no-fluff, content-rich blog posts that I may not have mentioned?
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