Passion flower.  Exotic flowers like these don't have to be limited to tropical gardens.  A vigorous perennial vine that climbs via by lauretta.bickford
lauretta.bickford
lauretta.bickford Passion flower. Exotic flowers like these don't have to be limited to tropical gardens. A vigorous perennial vine that climbs via
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The lace-like flower of Snake Gourd opens only after dark. It is a tropical or subtropical vine used for crafting didgeridoos. by Bluheart
Bluheart
Bluheart The lace-like flower of Snake Gourd opens only after dark. It is a tropical or subtropical vine used for crafting didgeridoos.
Flora
A walk along an urban trail is an education in diversity. You'll pass people of many nationalities and dress with one thing in common: they need exercise outdoors. You may notice that the plant world along the way is also inhabited by species from far away places.    Vinca, an evergreen ground cover vine that now inhabits much of North America, is actually native to parts of Europe, North Africa and western Asia. The name was probably derived from a Latin word meaning "to bind." Certainly, as a ground cover, it is very effective for erosion control. In addition, David MacKenzie in Perennial Ground Covers says the tough runners used to be twisted together to form rope.    The trailing, vine-like plant is in the Dogbane family, along with Bluestar (Amsonia spp.), Asiatic Jasmine (Trachelospermum asiaticum), Confederate Jasmine (T. jasminoides) and Mandevilla. Mature height as a ground cover is usually from 8" to 18". The runners root as they go. Flowers may be blue, white or burgundy, depending upon the cultivar. Vinca prefers moist soil in partial shade to full shade, but will also tolerate sun and drought. It is deer resistant.    Two species of Vinca are commonly available: Vinca major and Vinca minor.    Vinca major is so named because the flowers and leaves are larger and the runners longer than Vinca minor. Its common name is Bigleaf Periwinkle. Leaves are oval, green or variegated, 1" wide and approximately 2" long. Simple flowers are up to 2" diameter. It is reliably hardy in USDA climate zones 6 through 9. Recommended soil pH is 5.6 to 7.8. In addition to its effectiveness as a ground cover, it is a fine subject for hanging baskets. Plant 8" to 12"    Vinca minor is commonly known as dwarf periwinkle, creeping myrtle, or death myrtle. V. minor does contain toxic substances, but MacKenzie says that "during the Middle Ages, the heads of criminals who were to be executed were adorned with stems of V. minor, hence the Italian name Fiore di morte (flower of death)." Foliage is about 3/4" wide and 1" long. Mature height is less than V. major; about 4". Evergreen foliage is deep green and shiny. It is fine for erosion control in medium-sized areas provided that water does not flow with such force that the plants are dislodged before established. Vinca minor is hardy in USDA climate zones 4 through 8. Recommended soil pH is 6.1 to 7.8. Plant 6" to 12" apart.    Vinca does well in shallow soil, even where tree roots make it impossible to cultivate. But if possible, prepare the planting bed by cultivating at least 4" deep, removing all traces of weeds. Composted manure may be incorporated into the soil. Fertilizer may be used. If you choose to do so, incorporate 10-10-10 fertilizer at a rate of no more 2 lbs. per 100 square feet into the top 4" of soil. Avoid synthetic fertilizers contacting any part of your plants.    Vinca can be planted any time you have a shovel handy, even bare root plants. It is very tough. Nevertheless, you should water occasionally until the plants become established to avoid drought stress. Maintenance is minimal. Vinca has few pest and disease problems, and tolerates poor soil.    Because it is so common, some folks think that Vinca is over-used, even invasive. But I don't agree; I'm all about diversity. It does what a ground cover is supposed to do; it covers ground. Vinca is popular because it is effective, attractive, and requires little or no maintenance.    Return to Vinca at goGardenNow.com.  Posted by John Marshall at 7:48 AM 0 comments Links to this post  Labels: drought tolerant plants, ground covers, low maintenance perennial, vinca by marcia
marcia
marcia A walk along an urban trail is an education in diversity. You'll pass people of many nationalities and dress with one thing in common: they need exercise outdoors. You may notice that the plant world along the way is also inhabited by species from far away places. Vinca, an evergreen ground cover vine that now inhabits much of North America, is actually native to parts of Europe, North Africa and western Asia. The name was probably derived from a Latin word meaning "to bind." Certainly, as a ground cover, it is very effective for erosion control. In addition, David MacKenzie in Perennial Ground Covers says the tough runners used to be twisted together to form rope. The trailing, vine-like plant is in the Dogbane family, along with Bluestar (Amsonia spp.), Asiatic Jasmine (Trachelospermum asiaticum), Confederate Jasmine (T. jasminoides) and Mandevilla. Mature height as a ground cover is usually from 8" to 18". The runners root as they go. Flowers may be blue, white or burgundy, depending upon the cultivar. Vinca prefers moist soil in partial shade to full shade, but will also tolerate sun and drought. It is deer resistant. Two species of Vinca are commonly available: Vinca major and Vinca minor. Vinca major is so named because the flowers and leaves are larger and the runners longer than Vinca minor. Its common name is Bigleaf Periwinkle. Leaves are oval, green or variegated, 1" wide and approximately 2" long. Simple flowers are up to 2" diameter. It is reliably hardy in USDA climate zones 6 through 9. Recommended soil pH is 5.6 to 7.8. In addition to its effectiveness as a ground cover, it is a fine subject for hanging baskets. Plant 8" to 12" Vinca minor is commonly known as dwarf periwinkle, creeping myrtle, or death myrtle. V. minor does contain toxic substances, but MacKenzie says that "during the Middle Ages, the heads of criminals who were to be executed were adorned with stems of V. minor, hence the Italian name Fiore di morte (flower of death)." Foliage is about 3/4" wide and 1" long. Mature height is less than V. major; about 4". Evergreen foliage is deep green and shiny. It is fine for erosion control in medium-sized areas provided that water does not flow with such force that the plants are dislodged before established. Vinca minor is hardy in USDA climate zones 4 through 8. Recommended soil pH is 6.1 to 7.8. Plant 6" to 12" apart. Vinca does well in shallow soil, even where tree roots make it impossible to cultivate. But if possible, prepare the planting bed by cultivating at least 4" deep, removing all traces of weeds. Composted manure may be incorporated into the soil. Fertilizer may be used. If you choose to do so, incorporate 10-10-10 fertilizer at a rate of no more 2 lbs. per 100 square feet into the top 4" of soil. Avoid synthetic fertilizers contacting any part of your plants. Vinca can be planted any time you have a shovel handy, even bare root plants. It is very tough. Nevertheless, you should water occasionally until the plants become established to avoid drought stress. Maintenance is minimal. Vinca has few pest and disease problems, and tolerates poor soil. Because it is so common, some folks think that Vinca is over-used, even invasive. But I don't agree; I'm all about diversity. It does what a ground cover is supposed to do; it covers ground. Vinca is popular because it is effective, attractive, and requires little or no maintenance. Return to Vinca at goGardenNow.com. Posted by John Marshall at 7:48 AM 0 comments Links to this post Labels: drought tolerant plants, ground covers, low maintenance perennial, vinca
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firework aster These perennial flowers grow well in average soils, but needs full sun. Aster flowers come in blues, purples and a variety of pinks. All Asters are yellow in the center of the flower. They are daisy-like in appearance, even though they are a member of the sunflower family. by jewel
jewel
jewel firework aster These perennial flowers grow well in average soils, but needs full sun. Aster flowers come in blues, purples and a variety of pinks. All Asters are yellow in the center of the flower. They are daisy-like in appearance, even though they are a member of the sunflower family.
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Hosta Small Leaf 'Catherine'. Dusky blue, heart-shaped leaves are brushed with chartreuse and lime. The thick, broadly oval leaves have a corrugated texture and bold presence. This mid-size hosta is vigorous, yet stays neat and compact. Pale lavender flowers appear in mid-summer. Flowers Attract Butterflies and Hummingbirds. Great for Beds and Borders. Thrives in Shade. From Longfield Gardens by ilene
ilene
ilene Hosta Small Leaf 'Catherine'. Dusky blue, heart-shaped leaves are brushed with chartreuse and lime. The thick, broadly oval leaves have a corrugated texture and bold presence. This mid-size hosta is vigorous, yet stays neat and compact. Pale lavender flowers appear in mid-summer. Flowers Attract Butterflies and Hummingbirds. Great for Beds and Borders. Thrives in Shade. From Longfield Gardens
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Drawing from Christian Dior's passion for luxuriant, tropical nature, the 2013 Summer Look is an invitation to an exotic journey through Latin America and its colors.A true beauty multitasker. An exclusive jelly-like formula is available in richly saturated hues offering an al... $26.00 by nordstrom
nordstrom
nordstrom Drawing from Christian Dior's passion for luxuriant, tropical nature, the 2013 Summer Look is an invitation to an exotic journey through Latin America and its colors.A true beauty multitasker. An exclusive jelly-like formula is available in richly saturated hues offering an al... $26.00
Women
Jimmy Choo's limited-edition Exotic Eau de Toilette is inspired by the color python skins used in Jimmy Choo heels and accessories. The fragrance was created with strong, confident women in mind.Notes:- Top: blackcurrant sorbet, pink grapefruit.- Heart: passion flower, tiger o... $88.00 by nordstrom
nordstrom
nordstrom Jimmy Choo's limited-edition Exotic Eau de Toilette is inspired by the color python skins used in Jimmy Choo heels and accessories. The fragrance was created with strong, confident women in mind.Notes:- Top: blackcurrant sorbet, pink grapefruit.- Heart: passion flower, tiger o... $88.00
Women
Native volcanic cinders create an ideal natural habitat for these fascinating tropical plants. Firmly anchored in hand-selected porous rock, these exotic plants have been blessed by a Kahuna (Hawaiian spiritual leader) to bring joy and prosperity to their owners. They send up sensuous shoots, flowers and leaves in brilliant profusion. Easy to care for, the lava holds water like a sponge. Place in bright, indirect light and be prepared for perpetual delight. Stones included. USA grown. 12H<span style=color: #cc0000;><span>* 3-day delivery is included.</span> </span>Choose standard shipping at checkout and this item will be upgraded at no extra charge. Please see special shipping info for details. $59.00 by VivaTerra
VivaTerra
VivaTerra Native volcanic cinders create an ideal natural habitat for these fascinating tropical plants. Firmly anchored in hand-selected porous rock, these exotic plants have been blessed by a Kahuna (Hawaiian spiritual leader) to bring joy and prosperity to their owners. They send up sensuous shoots, flowers and leaves in brilliant profusion. Easy to care for, the lava holds water like a sponge. Place in bright, indirect light and be prepared for perpetual delight. Stones included. USA grown. 12H<span style=color: #cc0000;><span>* 3-day delivery is included.</span> </span>Choose standard shipping at checkout and this item will be upgraded at no extra charge. Please see special shipping info for details. $59.00
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Native volcanic cinders create an ideal natural habitat for these fascinating tropical plants. Firmly anchored in hand-selected porous rock, these exotic plants have been blessed by a Kahuna (Hawaiian spiritual leader) to bring joy and prosperity to their owners. They send up sensuous shoots, flowers and leaves in brilliant profusion. Easy to care for, the lava holds water like a sponge. Place in bright, indirect light and be prepared for perpetual delight. Stones included. USA grown.12H<span style=color: #cc0000;><span>* 3-day delivery is included.</span></span> Choose standard shipping at checkout and this item will be upgraded at no extra charge. Please see special shipping info for details. $59.00 by VivaTerra
VivaTerra
VivaTerra Native volcanic cinders create an ideal natural habitat for these fascinating tropical plants. Firmly anchored in hand-selected porous rock, these exotic plants have been blessed by a Kahuna (Hawaiian spiritual leader) to bring joy and prosperity to their owners. They send up sensuous shoots, flowers and leaves in brilliant profusion. Easy to care for, the lava holds water like a sponge. Place in bright, indirect light and be prepared for perpetual delight. Stones included. USA grown.12H<span style=color: #cc0000;><span>* 3-day delivery is included.</span></span> Choose standard shipping at checkout and this item will be upgraded at no extra charge. Please see special shipping info for details. $59.00
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YES this is a real flower: Hot lips ....Psychotria Elata    Affectionately known as Hooker’s lips, Psychotria elata with it’s colorful red flowers attracts many pollinators including butterflies and hummingbirds. Native to Tropical America, this specimen was found at the Butterfly Gardens in Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica. by mandy.ka.73
mandy.ka.73
mandy.ka.73 YES this is a real flower: Hot lips ....Psychotria Elata Affectionately known as Hooker’s lips, Psychotria elata with it’s colorful red flowers attracts many pollinators including butterflies and hummingbirds. Native to Tropical America, this specimen was found at the Butterfly Gardens in Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica.
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Tropical Flowers Vintage Pattern Pendant We have the best promotion for you and if you are interested in the related item or need more information reviews from the x customer who are own of them before please follow the link to see fully reviewsDiscount Deals
        
	Tropical Flower... by eaidamachitkuntana
eaidamachitkuntana
eaidamachitkuntana Tropical Flowers Vintage Pattern Pendant We have the best promotion for you and if you are interested in the related item or need more information reviews from the x customer who are own of them before please follow the link to see fully reviewsDiscount Deals Tropical Flower...
Tropical Flowers Vintage Pattern Pendant
LOVE LOVE LOVE this is perfect for my porch! How to Make a Terracotta Flower Tower with Annuals. Tutorial on how to make this vertical garden feature planter. Perfect for small gardens with limited space ... works well with fragrant herbs or a mix of flowers & herbs too. | The Micro Gardener by ava
ava
ava LOVE LOVE LOVE this is perfect for my porch! How to Make a Terracotta Flower Tower with Annuals. Tutorial on how to make this vertical garden feature planter. Perfect for small gardens with limited space ... works well with fragrant herbs or a mix of flowers & herbs too. | The Micro Gardener
Wedding and Party Stuff
Crinums laugh at drought, don't need fertilizer, & welcome hot, humid summers with lily-like flowers. Growing into huge bulbs over time, they're practically indestructible. Crinum Planting Guide &    Why You'll Love Them: Fragrant, trumpet-shaped flowers in many colors appear in spring, summer, or fall.  How to Grow: Most prefer at least five hours of sun a day. They're not picky about soil. Where to Grow: Most do best in the Lower, Coastal, and Tropical South (zones 8-10) by tdub624
tdub624
tdub624 Crinums laugh at drought, don't need fertilizer, & welcome hot, humid summers with lily-like flowers. Growing into huge bulbs over time, they're practically indestructible. Crinum Planting Guide & Why You'll Love Them: Fragrant, trumpet-shaped flowers in many colors appear in spring, summer, or fall. How to Grow: Most prefer at least five hours of sun a day. They're not picky about soil. Where to Grow: Most do best in the Lower, Coastal, and Tropical South (zones 8-10)
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Holes in your Toms? Give them a makeover! (via Her New Leaf)  I don't have Toms (yet) but I know people that do and this seems like a good idea for helping them last a bit longer. Looks cute, too. It's not sewing, but I didn't know what other category to put this under. by rebecca2
rebecca2
rebecca2 Holes in your Toms? Give them a makeover! (via Her New Leaf) I don't have Toms (yet) but I know people that do and this seems like a good idea for helping them last a bit longer. Looks cute, too. It's not sewing, but I didn't know what other category to put this under.
The Look
They used to use urine to tan animal skins, so families used to all pee in a pot & then once a day it was taken & Sold to the tannery.......if you had to do this to survive you were "Piss Poor"  But worse than that were the really poor folk who couldn't even afford to buy a pot......they "didn't have a pot to piss in" & were the lowest of the low  The next time you are washing your hands and complain because the water temperature isn't just how you like it, think about how things used to be. Here are some facts about the 1500s:  Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in May, and they still smelled pretty good by June.. However, since they were starting to smell . ...... . Brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor. Hence the custom today of carrying a bouquet when getting Married.  Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the women and finally the children. Last of all the babies. By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it.. Hence the saying, "Don't throw the baby out with the Bath water!"  Houses had thatched roofs-thick straw-piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof... Hence the saying "It's raining cats and dogs."  There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection. That's how canopy beds came into existence.  The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt. Hence the saying, "Dirt poor." The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on floor to help keep their footing. As the winter wore on, they added more thresh until, when you opened the door, it would all start slipping outside. A piece of wood was placed in the entrance-way. Hence: a thresh hold.  In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire.. Every day they lit the fire and added things to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight and then start over the next day. Sometimes stew had food in it that had been there for quite a while. Hence the rhyme: Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old. Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special. When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off. It was a sign of wealth that a man could, "bring home the bacon." They would cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit around and chew the fat.  Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with high acid content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.  Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or the upper crust.  Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky. The combination would Sometimes knock the imbibers out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial.. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up. Hence the custom of holding a wake.  England is old and small and the local folks started running out of places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a bone-house, and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive... So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the graveyard shift.) to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be, saved by the bell or was considered a dead ringer.  And that's the truth....Now, whoever said History was boring by NoelleGarcia
NoelleGarcia
NoelleGarcia They used to use urine to tan animal skins, so families used to all pee in a pot & then once a day it was taken & Sold to the tannery.......if you had to do this to survive you were "Piss Poor" But worse than that were the really poor folk who couldn't even afford to buy a pot......they "didn't have a pot to piss in" & were the lowest of the low The next time you are washing your hands and complain because the water temperature isn't just how you like it, think about how things used to be. Here are some facts about the 1500s: Most people got married in June because they took their yearly bath in May, and they still smelled pretty good by June.. However, since they were starting to smell . ...... . Brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor. Hence the custom today of carrying a bouquet when getting Married. Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the other sons and men, then the women and finally the children. Last of all the babies. By then the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it.. Hence the saying, "Don't throw the baby out with the Bath water!" Houses had thatched roofs-thick straw-piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the cats and other small animals (mice, bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof... Hence the saying "It's raining cats and dogs." There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This posed a real problem in the bedroom where bugs and other droppings could mess up your nice clean bed. Hence, a bed with big posts and a sheet hung over the top afforded some protection. That's how canopy beds came into existence. The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt. Hence the saying, "Dirt poor." The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh (straw) on floor to help keep their footing. As the winter wore on, they added more thresh until, when you opened the door, it would all start slipping outside. A piece of wood was placed in the entrance-way. Hence: a thresh hold. In those old days, they cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire.. Every day they lit the fire and added things to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight and then start over the next day. Sometimes stew had food in it that had been there for quite a while. Hence the rhyme: Peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old. Sometimes they could obtain pork, which made them feel quite special. When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off. It was a sign of wealth that a man could, "bring home the bacon." They would cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit around and chew the fat. Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with high acid content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous. Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burnt bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or the upper crust. Lead cups were used to drink ale or whisky. The combination would Sometimes knock the imbibers out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial.. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up. Hence the custom of holding a wake. England is old and small and the local folks started running out of places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and would take the bones to a bone-house, and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of 25 coffins were found to have scratch marks on the inside and they realized they had been burying people alive... So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the graveyard shift.) to listen for the bell; thus, someone could be, saved by the bell or was considered a dead ringer. And that's the truth....Now, whoever said History was boring
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