The ruins of Fountains Abbey, the largest monastic ruin in England, are picked out beautifully by the frost. Britain from Above: Month by by KathyNguyen
KathyNguyen
KathyNguyen The ruins of Fountains Abbey, the largest monastic ruin in England, are picked out beautifully by the frost. Britain from Above: Month by
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~Crossraguel Abbey, Scotland. A Cluniac monastery founded in 1244 by Duncan, heir to the Earldom of Carrick. The extraordinary thing about Crossraguel is just how much of the site is still relatively intact; the extensive ruins include the church, chapterhouse, gatehouse, dovecot, cloister and a tall tower house which offers wonderful views over the site from the top. The founding monks came from Paisley Abbey, the only other Cluniac monastic house in Scotland~ by winnie
winnie
winnie ~Crossraguel Abbey, Scotland. A Cluniac monastery founded in 1244 by Duncan, heir to the Earldom of Carrick. The extraordinary thing about Crossraguel is just how much of the site is still relatively intact; the extensive ruins include the church, chapterhouse, gatehouse, dovecot, cloister and a tall tower house which offers wonderful views over the site from the top. The founding monks came from Paisley Abbey, the only other Cluniac monastic house in Scotland~
All Things British
SUNDIAL RING    Who needs a watch when we have the sun?    Technology is awesome, but can we trust it? How can we be sure that our cell phones aren't recording our brain waves and transmitting our ideas to evil corporations? How can we be sure that our watches aren't silently recording our pulses and sending the data to Big Food so they know when to advertise those juicy bacon cheeseburgers on TV and ruin our diet plans? Yeah, see, now you're paranoid too. We've taken the mirrors out of our bathrooms to avoid that classic horror movie moment, too. We recommend you do the same. Preventative paranoia is the key to success.  Both models    Part of our plan is eschewing traditional watches for the sundial. Inspired by designs from Babylonia, Egypt, the Celts of Northern Europe, the Mayans and Incas and Aztecs, we've found the most imaginative and accurate wearable sundials anywhere. Instructions for reading your new sundial are included. Batteries, however, are not. They're not needed! Who needs batteries to sense the rhythms of the solar system? Guaranteed to work as long as the sun rises... and we don't want to think about the day that stops happening.    How the Sundial works...  On a sunny day, suspend the sundial by its black satin cord. Through a tiny hole, a thin ray of sunshine will illuminate a number on the inside of the dial showing the time of day. This Aquitaine sundial was named after Eleanor of Aquitaine, who gave one to King Henry II of England so Henry would know when to return from the hunt for their love trysts. (One must always be timely for love trysts. Tryst us on that one.)    How the Stardial works...  Set the middle wheel to the month, hold the dial upside down, and sight the North Star through the center hole. Move the top of the dial's arm to align with the uppermost stars of the Big Dipper, and read the time on the inner dial where the arm crosses the hour mark! Star dials were first used in the 15th century by navigators and are extremely accurate because they are based on the North Star. by geraldine
geraldine
geraldine SUNDIAL RING Who needs a watch when we have the sun? Technology is awesome, but can we trust it? How can we be sure that our cell phones aren't recording our brain waves and transmitting our ideas to evil corporations? How can we be sure that our watches aren't silently recording our pulses and sending the data to Big Food so they know when to advertise those juicy bacon cheeseburgers on TV and ruin our diet plans? Yeah, see, now you're paranoid too. We've taken the mirrors out of our bathrooms to avoid that classic horror movie moment, too. We recommend you do the same. Preventative paranoia is the key to success. Both models Part of our plan is eschewing traditional watches for the sundial. Inspired by designs from Babylonia, Egypt, the Celts of Northern Europe, the Mayans and Incas and Aztecs, we've found the most imaginative and accurate wearable sundials anywhere. Instructions for reading your new sundial are included. Batteries, however, are not. They're not needed! Who needs batteries to sense the rhythms of the solar system? Guaranteed to work as long as the sun rises... and we don't want to think about the day that stops happening. How the Sundial works... On a sunny day, suspend the sundial by its black satin cord. Through a tiny hole, a thin ray of sunshine will illuminate a number on the inside of the dial showing the time of day. This Aquitaine sundial was named after Eleanor of Aquitaine, who gave one to King Henry II of England so Henry would know when to return from the hunt for their love trysts. (One must always be timely for love trysts. Tryst us on that one.) How the Stardial works... Set the middle wheel to the month, hold the dial upside down, and sight the North Star through the center hole. Move the top of the dial's arm to align with the uppermost stars of the Big Dipper, and read the time on the inner dial where the arm crosses the hour mark! Star dials were first used in the 15th century by navigators and are extremely accurate because they are based on the North Star.
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This is a true story of Mother’ s Sacrifice during the Japan Earthquake. After the Earthquake had subsided, when the rescuers reached the ruins of a young woman’s house, they saw her dead body through the cracks. But her pose was somehow strange that she knelt on her knees like a person was worshiping; her body was leaning forward, and her two hands were supporting by an object. The collapsed house had crashed her back and her head. With so many difficulties, the leader of the rescuer team put his hand through a narrow gap on the wall to reach the woman’s body. He was hoping that this woman could be still alive. However, the cold and stiff body told him that she had passed away for sure. He and the rest of the team left this house and were going to search the next collapsed building. For some reasons, the team leader was driven by a compelling force to go back to the ruin house of the dead woman. Again, he knelt down and used his had through the narrow cracks to search the little space under the dead body. Suddenly, he screamed with excitement,” A child! There is a child! “ The whole team worked together; carefully they removed the piles of ruined objects around the dead woman. There was a 3 months old little boy wrapped in a flowery blanket under his mother’ s dead body. Obviously, the woman had made an ultimate sacrifice for saving her son. When her house was falling, she used her body to make a cover to protect her son. The little boy was still sleeping peacefully when the team leader picked him up. The medical doctor came quickly to exam the little boy. After he opened the blanket, he saw a cell phone inside the blanket. There was a text message on the screen. It said ,” If you can survive, you must remember that I love you.” This cell phone was passing around from one hand to another. Every body that read the message wept. ” If you can survive, you must remember that I love you.” Such is the mother’ s love for her child!! by kat62105
kat62105
kat62105 This is a true story of Mother’ s Sacrifice during the Japan Earthquake. After the Earthquake had subsided, when the rescuers reached the ruins of a young woman’s house, they saw her dead body through the cracks. But her pose was somehow strange that she knelt on her knees like a person was worshiping; her body was leaning forward, and her two hands were supporting by an object. The collapsed house had crashed her back and her head. With so many difficulties, the leader of the rescuer team put his hand through a narrow gap on the wall to reach the woman’s body. He was hoping that this woman could be still alive. However, the cold and stiff body told him that she had passed away for sure. He and the rest of the team left this house and were going to search the next collapsed building. For some reasons, the team leader was driven by a compelling force to go back to the ruin house of the dead woman. Again, he knelt down and used his had through the narrow cracks to search the little space under the dead body. Suddenly, he screamed with excitement,” A child! There is a child! “ The whole team worked together; carefully they removed the piles of ruined objects around the dead woman. There was a 3 months old little boy wrapped in a flowery blanket under his mother’ s dead body. Obviously, the woman had made an ultimate sacrifice for saving her son. When her house was falling, she used her body to make a cover to protect her son. The little boy was still sleeping peacefully when the team leader picked him up. The medical doctor came quickly to exam the little boy. After he opened the blanket, he saw a cell phone inside the blanket. There was a text message on the screen. It said ,” If you can survive, you must remember that I love you.” This cell phone was passing around from one hand to another. Every body that read the message wept. ” If you can survive, you must remember that I love you.” Such is the mother’ s love for her child!!
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