Tip: You could have different following groups for different subjects. For example you can follow someone's collection related to DIY in DIY following group, and other collection related to fashion in Fashion following group.


The students read the passage independently, then travel around the classroom answering the questions on butcher paper. There can be 3-4 stations with each station asking a question about a story element (i.e. one on characters, one on setting etc). Each stations has enough squares for each student in the class to write their answer. The question can be posted on the butcher paper, or on the wall. Students must support their answer with evidence by NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita The students read the passage independently, then travel around the classroom answering the questions on butcher paper. There can be 3-4 stations with each station asking a question about a story element (i.e. one on characters, one on setting etc). Each stations has enough squares for each student in the class to write their answer. The question can be posted on the butcher paper, or on the wall. Students must support their answer with evidence
Class
Fun and FREE lesson to teach Area & Perimeter using literature! by NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita Fun and FREE lesson to teach Area & Perimeter using literature!
Class
Lesson using Wheat Thins & Twizzlers to teach area & perimeter of a rectangle. by NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita Lesson using Wheat Thins & Twizzlers to teach area & perimeter of a rectangle.
Class
Teaching With a Mountain View: Writing Summaries by NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita Teaching With a Mountain View: Writing Summaries
Class
Great way to teach area and perimeter! by NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita Great way to teach area and perimeter!
Class
A quick get to know you/math (counting and graphing) activity. Later in the year students can generate the questions and write them. Place on light colored paper, laminate, and questions can be added with white board marker. by NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita A quick get to know you/math (counting and graphing) activity. Later in the year students can generate the questions and write them. Place on light colored paper, laminate, and questions can be added with white board marker.
Class
Original Pin - Have students write their names on the side of a sheet of paper (first or both first and last). Then have them write one simile that describes them for each letter in their name. Kids can decorate them however they like and the acrostic simile poems can be hung above all student's desks for display. Great way to practice using similes! by NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita Original Pin - Have students write their names on the side of a sheet of paper (first or both first and last). Then have them write one simile that describes them for each letter in their name. Kids can decorate them however they like and the acrostic simile poems can be hung above all student's desks for display. Great way to practice using similes!
Class
Question and Answer board - give students the answer and they have to write a word problem that matches the answer. You can have students do any operation or even 2 step problems. I have my students check each other's questions the next day. by NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita Question and Answer board - give students the answer and they have to write a word problem that matches the answer. You can have students do any operation or even 2 step problems. I have my students check each other's questions the next day.
Class
The students read the passage independently, then travel around the classroom answering the questions on butcher paper. There can be 3-4 stations with each station asking a question about a story element (i.e. one on characters, one on setting etc). Each stations has enough squares for each student in the class to write their answer. The question can be posted on the butcher paper, or on the wall. Students must support their answer with evidence by NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita
NeskaPolita The students read the passage independently, then travel around the classroom answering the questions on butcher paper. There can be 3-4 stations with each station asking a question about a story element (i.e. one on characters, one on setting etc). Each stations has enough squares for each student in the class to write their answer. The question can be posted on the butcher paper, or on the wall. Students must support their answer with evidence
Class